Coffee Profiles

Java Momma sources high quality coffee beans from around the world. They are sold as single origin or mixed to create our signature blends and flavored coffees.

Java Momma Coffee Profiles

Ethiopia Washed Yirgacheffe Konga

Tasting Notes

Body

Above Average

Sweetness

Above Average

Acidity

Above Average

Flavors

Lemon
Milk Chocolate
Orange

Brewing Suggestions

Cold Brew
Drip
Espresso

Ethiopia Yirgacheffe Konga is sourced from small coffee producers organized around the Kebel Konga coffee mill, located in the Gedeo Zone of the Yirgacheffe district. The Gedeo Zone is named after the Gedeo people who are indigenous to this area. Ripe cherries, indigenous varietals, are delivered to the Kebel Konga mill. Dried in the sun on drying beds for approx. 12-15 days.

In the daytime the cherries need to be raked continuously in order to ensure a consistent drying process. In the day time , it will be covered from 12 to 3pm in order to protect it from the hot sun, as well as, when the night comes, the beds are carefully covered to protect it from rain fall. The beans are transported in parchment to Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, to be milled and bagged prior to export

Coffee Details

Elevation

1800-2000 Meters

Process

Fully Washed

Drying

Raised Beds

Varietals

Ethiopian Heirloom

Harvest

October

Export

January

Brazil Mogiana Royal Select MWP decaf

Tasting Notes

Body

Average

Sweetness

Average

Acidity

Low

Flavors

Dark Chocolate
Walnut

Brewing Suggestions

Drip
Espresso

On July 11, 1985 the Cooperativa de Cafeicultores e Agropecuaristas (COCAPEC) was founded. COCAPEC began with almost 300 members in its first year of operations, and today it has grown to over 2,000 members. COCAPEC is renowned in this coffee-growing region for its technical support and natural drying methods. The cooperative’s technical department works in partnership with its members to guarantee consistent coffee quality.

Currently, the high Mogiana region has an average annual production of more than one million bags of coffee, of which 85% is high quality beans produced at an optimal altitude and temperature. Our current offering is Fine Cup (FC) and Strictly Soft (SS), the highest cup category in the Brazilian coffee grading.

Coffee Details

Elevation

800-1200 meters

Process

Decaf

Drying

Mechanical

Varietals

Bourbon, Mundo Novo

Harvest

May

Export

August

Organic Bali Blue Moon (Wet hulled)

Tasting Notes

Body

Above Average

Sweetness

Average

Acidity

Low

Flavors

BlackLicorice
Syrupy
Dark Chocolate
Cedar

Brewing Suggestions

French Press
Espresso

In Indonesia lies a hidden jewel, the island of Bali. The eruption of the Gunung Agung Volcano in 1963 caused a delay in the progress of modern-day coffee cultivation on Bali. In response to this situation, the government enacted programs to help rejuvenate coffee production. With the distribution of coffee seedlings to local farmers, an island wide coffee growing campaign began.

Today, the coffee growing area in Bali is an estimated 7,500 hectares. Coffee tree varieties include Bourbon and Typica, along with shade trees such as Erythrina, Albizia, Tangerine and Orange. The use of pesticides is prohibited, and all fertilizers are 100% organic.

The Subak Abian is a traditional farming structure organization in Bali, similar to a farmer cooperative. There are 13 different Subak Abians that are currently growing and processing coffee. The promotion of improved coffee growing practices is expected to enhance not only agricultural technology but social and economic standing in Bali as well.

Coffee Details

Elevation

1220-1524 meters

Process

Wet hulled

Drying

Patio and Solar Dried Machine

Varietals

Bourbon, Typica

Harvest

May

Export

July

Colombia Excelso E/P

Tasting Notes

Body

Low

Sweetness

Above Average

Acidity

Average

Flavors

Orange
Milk Chocolate
Cherry

Brewing Suggestions

Drip

Colombia Excelso comes from small family-owned farms in the Colombian “coffee triangle.” The main harvest is between October and January, and the “mitaca” harvest is between April and June. Small coffee producers pick and process their coffee at their own micro-wet mills and then dry their own coffee, typically on elevated tables inside solar dryers that provide protection from the rain.

Coffee Details

Elevation

1300-1650 meters

Process

Fully Washed

Drying

Not defined

Varietals

Caturra, Colombia, Typica, Castillo

Harvest

October

Export

April

India Monsoon Malabar AA

Tasting Notes

Body

Average

Sweetness

Low

Acidity

Low

Flavors

Molasses
Creamy
Bakers Chocolate

Brewing Suggestions

French Press
Espresso

The origination of Indian Monsoon Malabar coffee dates back to the era when wooden ships loaded with raw coffee beans would take up to 6 months to travel from India to Europe, sailing around the Cape of Good Hope. During the months that the coffee beans were transported at sea, the humidity and ocean winds combined to cause the coffee to change from its fresh green color to a more aged, pale yellow hue.

Upon their arrival in Europe, the coffee beans were found to have a unique mellowness, soft and smooth tasting throughout the cup, so that the coffee became an instant hit with Europeans, paving the way for the birth of a new coffee type. Today these conditions are replicated in warehouses during the Indian monsoon season so that the coffee beans, exposed to constant humid conditions, undergo the same characteristic changes in size, texture, appearance and in the cup.

Coffee Details

Elevation

1220 meters

Process

Other

Drying

Patio sun dried

Varietals

Kents, Cauwery

Harvest

October

Export

November

Mexico HG Chiapas E/P

Tasting Notes

Body

Above Average

Sweetness

Average

Acidity

Low

Flavors

Brown Sugar
Milk Chocolate
Orange

Brewing Suggestions

French Press
Drip

This lot is sourced from the southern state of Chiapas, Mexico, where the mountain ranges provide an ideal altitude and climate for specialty coffee production. The vast majority of farms in the area small, family-owned plots under 10 acres in size. Coffee is dried in the sun on patios and in mechanical dryers known as guardiolas when needed.

Coffee Details

Elevation

900 meters

Process

Fully Washed

Drying

Mechanical

Varietals

Kents, Cauwery

Harvest

October

Export

March

Sumatra Takengon GR1 DP Sara Ate

Tasting Notes

Body

Low

Sweetness

Above Average

Acidity

Average

Flavors

Dark Chocolate
Cherry
Cedar

Brewing Suggestions

French Press
Drip

Sumatra Takengon GR1 DP Sara Ate (RNY# 44342)

The Sara Ate Coop has been producing coffee in the Takengon region from a collective of small farm owners since the late 1990’s. They have over 500 members that comprise the cooperative. A good many of the coffees that we purchase from Sara Ate is organic. We have had some of our best Sumatra deliveries, be them conventional or organic, from them for many years.

Coffee Details

Elevation

1200 meters

Process

Wet Hulled

Drying

Patio and solar dried machine

Varietals

Catimor

Harvest

August

Export

September

Coffee Language

Coffee language can be confusing and, like wine, certain terms have different meanings to how we use them in day to day living. We’ve created a list of all the common words used in this site so that you can get a complete picture of the differences in our coffees.

Aroma: Quite simply, the smell.

Acidity: Often confused with sour or bitter expressions, acidity refers to how lively or tangy the upfront reaction is on your palatte. Acidity is not a dirty word! It is a sensation that is always current in coffee and  In the same way a sparkling water activates certain sensations in your mouth, coffee with a high acidity will do the same. Low acidity refers to a mellow or smooth sensation.

Body:  This refers to the weight or the thickness the coffee has in your mouth. The range of sensations are from light, thin, average to above average, rich, strong and sometimes syrupy. A good full-bodied coffee in a long black might suddenly wash out completely in a milk based drink because the elements that activate certain areas of your mouth are negated by the milk.

Flavours: Similar to wine, Coffee has its own unique set of flavours that come through. The standard reference is based on how they taste in a black coffee as flavours completely change when adding milk and since there is no standard for which milk is used in coffee, we must only refer to the flavours you can detect in the espresso or black coffees. The flavour descriptions are an overall impression that you get from tasting the coffee. Often there are certain flavours that hit you upfront which then shift into secondary flavours and aftertastes. When we say “Stone Fruits” we don’t mean your coffee is Peach-Flavoured, we simply mean it has hints or overtones of peaches and apricots whilst still tasting like coffee.